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Power Sheds wins prestigious Lloyds Bank Business Award

Bradford Based Power Sheds was announced winner of the ‘Best New Business’ at the prestigious 2020 Lloyds Bank National Business Awards, which took place during a glittering online ceremony on 10 November.  Power Sheds were amongst a number of companies honoured at the event including a Formula One team and a TV baker.

The is the latest national award Power Sheds have won in 2020 following the eBay award for innovation and a Great British Entrepreneur award. Power Sheds, based on the Euroway Trading Estate, launched in 2019 manufacturing garden sheds.

Jack Sutcliffe, CEO of Power Sheds, said “We are enormously proud to have won a Lloyds Bank National Business Awards – this award represents the culmination of our hard work and dedication over the last 12 months.”

The Lloyds Bank Award Judges added “This is an exceptional growth story. Power Sheds has a good, innovative product and is tapping into a lucrative market. It was a clear winner. 2020 has been a challenging but inspiring year; a year where we’ve witnessed just how innovative and adaptive the UK business community can be, whether that means helping employees adjust to new ways of working or shifting production towards masks, ventilators and handwash. This year’s winners are testament to the creativity, agility and resilience that sets British business apart,” said Sarah Austin, Awards Director.

“When it comes to business recognition, the Lloyds Bank National Business Awards really are the ones to win, allowing successful individuals and organisations to tell their story, from large private and public companies, to thriving entrepreneurial businesses, promising start-ups and established SMEs, and what fantastic stories they are.”

The full list of winners is at: www.nationalbusinessawards.co.uk

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